Notes to Global Justice

1. For discussion of whether or not such concerns can be accommodated in Rawls’s theory, see Martin and Reidy 2006.

2. Nationalists also often claim that self-determination is crucial in securing what matters to members of the nation. The right to self-determination protects space for expression and promotion of national values and life. These claims give rise to a range of interesting questions such as, when is a group eligible for the right to self-determination? When does the right to self-determination entail a right to territory? When would the right to self-determination give rise to a strong claim to secession? And when should the right to self-determination yield to other concerns of global justice such as protection of human rights? See the entries Secession and Nationalism for more on these issues.

3. For some critics who challenge this claim see Cohen 2010 and Risse 2005.

4. For another sophisticated account of how we should apportion responsibilities, see Richard Miller (Miller 2010). By tracking the different kinds of relationships between different persons and investigating their characteristics, such as different histories of exploitation or domination, Richard Miller offers a nuanced account of international justice that includes strong responsibilities in the global sphere when people have been unfairly taken advantage of.

Copyright © 2015 by
Gillian Brock <g.brock@auckland.ac.nz>

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